Someone said, “It’s better to keep your mouth shut and appear dumb than it is to open it and remove all doubt.” Or, as Forest Gump’s mother said, “Stupid is as stupid does.” Sometimes, mental aptitude is demonstrated by the stupid things a person does.

Take, for instance, dumb criminals. Last month, Glen Flory, Jr., entered a Bentleyville, PA, bank and approached a teller asking for a deposit slip. Flory allegedly wrote a note demanding money, and then signed his own name to the deposit slip. He fled the bank with more than $1300.

Police had no trouble identifying him, tracking him down and arresting him.

Several years ago, Timothy Chapek broke into Hillary MacKenzie’s house in Portland, OR, went into the bathroom and began taking a shower. Then he heard the homeowner return, so he locked the door and called 911 because he was afraid.

“I just broke into a house, and the owners came home,” the intruder told the emergency operator. “I think they have guns.”

The startled homeowner hollered, “Why are you in my house taking a shower?”

“I’m sorry,” said Chapek.

“Who are you?”

“My name is Timothy Chapek.”

“Why are you in my shower?”

“I broke in.”

Then MacKenzie said, “All right, then I’m calling the police.”

The intruder said, “I’ve already called them. They’re on the phone right now.”

Officers arrived at the house and arrested Chapek without incident. The police report said that Chapek is intelligent, “but conversation with him suggests mental issues of some sort.”

Then there are the guys who leave a calling card at the scene.

In Odgen, UT, a few Decembers ago, Cameron Hall broke into a car in the Day’s Inn parking lot and stole a GPS and some medication, but left his wallet in the car.

The car owner turned it over to police, who were standing at the Day’s Inn front desk when Hall came back to ask if anybody had found his wallet. When confronted by officers, Hall admitted the break-in and still had the GPS in his possession.

In Romulus, MI, a man attempted to rob a Marathon Gas Station, but the clerk pulled a gun, and the robber fled on foot. He left his vehicle in the parking lot with his driver’s license in it.

In Colorado Springs, CO, a young man walked into the corner store with a shot-gun and demanded cash. The clerk put cash in a bag, but then the crook spotted a bottle of scotch behind the counter. He demanded the drink, also.

The clerk refused and said he didn’t look 21. So the robber pulled out his wallet, took out his driver’s license and handed it to the store clerk. The clerk acknowledged that, indeed, he was 21 and gave him the scotch.

As soon as the man left, the clerk called police, gave them the man’s name and address, and the guy was arrested two hours later.

Reader’s Digest wrote about the Des Moines, IA, robber who left his coat at the scene. In his coat pocket was his W-2.

In another incident, Justin John Bouldin of St. Paul, MN, got into an argument with a woman at the bus stop and punched her in the face. He then fled, but dropped his folder. Inside was his homework from his anger management class with his name on it.

What do these incidents have in common? Not much smarts, for sure!

Can you believe that some people commit crazy acts, and then blame God for the consequences?

“God, why did you let me get caught?”

Proverbs 19:3 reads, “The stupidity of a person turns his life upside down, and his heart rages against the Lord” (The God’s Word translation).

Or, as the New Living Translation reads, “People ruin their lives by their own foolishness, and then are angry at the Lord.”

Our sins usually come back to haunt us, and there’s always a price to pay. Or, as the old saying goes, “Be sure, your sins will find you out.”

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Dr. David L. Chancey is the pastor of McDonough Road Baptist Church in Fayetteville, Georgia. Pastor David grew up in Southwest Atlanta in his early years, then moved to Milledgeville, Georgia, when his father took a job transfer. He graduated from Baldwin County High School, attended Georgia College, graduated from Georgia Southern University with a BS in Journalism, graduated from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary with a Master of Divinity, and then from New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary with a Doctor of Ministry. As God's call upon his life evolved, he served in denominational communications, then as a BSU director, and finally in the pastorate, where he served Carmel Baptist Church, Carmel, Indiana; Cool Springs Baptist Church, Tate, Georgia; and currently McDonough Road Baptist Church (MRBC) since 1999. He describes the best thing to ever happen to him outside of receiving Jesus Christ as Savior is marrying Amy, an RN and neonatal intensive care unit nurse. He and Amy have four children (Rebecca, Rachel, Ruth and Jonathan), and, though he says he's not old enough to be a grandfather, six grandchildren. David loves to preach, but also loves pastoring. He enjoys "just hanging out" with his flock, especially if it involves eating. He is thrilled when he sees members "growing in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ," and when people come to Christ. His desire is to lead MRBC to impact as many people as possible with the life-changing power of the Gospel. This desire to impact lives with the Gospel has led him to take an annual mission trip to Santa Catarina, Brazil, in recent years, where he has seen over 2100 persons come to Christ and new churches planted and strengthened. He is also leading MRBC to strive to new levels in missions going, giving, and praying. David enjoys spending time with family as often as possible, getting away with Amy, following the Atlanta Braves and University of Georgia Bulldogs, and writing a regular column for The Citizen, one of our local papers. He also enjoys running. Please visit him on the web or social media at the above links.

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